10 Inspirational Quotes on Writing by Great Authors

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“No book is really worth reading at the age of ten which is not equally – and often far more – worth reading at the age of fifty and beyond.” ― C.S. Lewis

“A good novel tells us the truth about its hero; but a bad novel tells us the truth about its author.” ― G.K. Chesterton, Heretics

“There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.” ― Ernest Hemingway

“Writing is a form of therapy; sometimes I wonder how all those who do not write, compose, or paint can manage to escape the madness, melancholia, the panic and fear which is inherent in a human situation.” ― Graham Greene, Ways Of Escape

“Everywhere I go I’m asked if I think the university stifles writers. My opinion is that they don’t stifle enough of them. There’s many a best-seller that could have been prevented by a good teacher.” ― Flannery O’Connor

“If you’re going to have a complicated story you must work to a map; otherwise you’ll never make a map of it afterwards.” ― J.R.R. Tolkien

“Writing in English is the most ingenious torture ever devised for sins committed in previous lives. The English reading public explains the reason why.” ― James Joyce

“No one will write books once they reach heaven, but there is an excellent library, containing all the books written up to date, including all the lost books and the ones that the authors burned when they came back from the last publisher.” ― Evelyn Waugh

“Great stories give us the grace of a mystical experience, on the level of the imagination.” ― Peter Kreeft, The Philosophy of Tolkien: The Worldview Behind the Lord of the Rings

“Fiction doesn’t tell us something we don’t know, it tells us something we know but don’t know that we know.” ― Walker Percy

Do you have a favorite quote about writing? 

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Don’t Let Editing Get in the Way of Writing!

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Don’t Let Editing Get in the Way of Writing!

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It’s easy to do. You’re in the middle of writing your manuscript and you stop every now and then to fix a typo or add punctuation. You want your writing to be perfect, after-all, right? But what if editing your work while writing it is actually harming your masterpiece? How can that be?

Well, consider these points regarding the process of editing as you write.

  • It slows you down – When you’re in the mood to write and your inspiration is flowing, you don’t want to stop to fix your punctuation or spelling. When you’re inspired and motivated, you really need to take advantage of those opportunities. So just write, no matter how messy it looks. The point of this stage is to get your ideas on paper.
  • It’s distracting – How can you focus on what you’re writing when you keep stopping to edit? And how can you meet a daily writing goal if you’re distracted with edits?
  • It’s not necessary – At least not while you’re still writing your manuscript. And editing requires as much attention as -actually more than- writing. 

So, when do you edit?

When you’re not motivated to write -unless, it’s time to edit, of course. Yes, when you don’t feel like writing or worse, you feel as if you can’t write. Use this time constructively by editing. Not only will this effort be a way to continue forward with the completion of your manuscript, it may just inspire you to actually write!

What are your thoughts about editing while writing?

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Check Out My Posts at Project Inspired

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Project Inspired is a busy place to be these days. Not just because of the many awesome posts to inspire young Christian girls, but also because of the many young girls that visit.

There’s so much to discuss, from fashion to natural beauty and Christian teaching to pop culture. If you haven’t checked it out, you should. That’s where I’ve been spending much of my time these days.

Check out some of my posts there! 

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“Freeing Tanner Rose” Update: Jumping into Chapter One When Writing Fiction Novels

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I’m reluctant to get into editing the “final” draft of Freeing Tanner Rose. Why? In contemplating it’s conclusion, I’ve realized that I have to introduce a new beginning. This may seem like a drastic change at such a late stage -and maybe there would have been a time when such a decision was unnerving, but it won’t be the first time.

When finalizing The Destiny of Sunshine Ranch I did the same thing. What was supposed to be the first chapter of that novel is now four pages into chapter 4. And I feel the story has been strengthened because of it.

If the idea of moving chapters around, changing the introduction or even changing the ending of the whole novel enters your mind, don’t brush it away. It’s tempting, I know, but the notion exists for a reason. Your reader has to jump into chapter one and not want to leave your story until it’s absolutely necessary. I’m not sure the first chapter of Freeing Tanner Rose achieves this.

If you decide to make a drastic change to your fiction novel at the last stage, remember to make sure that the change is reflected wherever necessary throughout the novel. To ensure this is the case, you’ll have to get a pair of fresh eyes to read the whole novel for you.

Sure, the change will likely knock you off schedule, but if your desire is to put out quality fiction, the wait will be worth it!

Good luck, God bless and wish me the same!

Ugh! Time to get to it.

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Control Your Fiction Novel With a “Moral Premise”

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I’ve read many books in my journey to become a better novelist. Some have been awesome, in my opinion, and others…not so much! One resource that I’ve found to be very helpful is The Moral Premise: Harnessing Virtue and Vice for Box Office Success. Stanley D Williams is the author, and his insight on novel writing is definitely inspiring.

The Moral Premise describes how successful motion pictures are always structured around a psychological (or spiritual) premise based on true moral values, and how screenwriters can appropriate the structural elements of the moral premise to write successful movies. (moralpremise.com)

Before reading this book, I found my writing would easily drift off into irrelevant directions. Williams helped me bring everything back to the “moral premise.” I read the whole thing years ago, but I continue to refer to it often. I highly recommend this book.

Do you find yourself getting lost in your own story line? Have you read The Moral Premise? Share your thoughts!

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I Want to Write a Novel, But Where Do I Start?

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Many people aspire to writing a novel, but the idea of doing so can be really daunting. Oftentimes, they’re so overwhelmed by the idea of where to begin, that they never actually get to it.

Writing a novel isn’t easy. There are many steps to the process. And beginning a novel is the first one…well actually, it’s the first phase, made up of a bunch of steps!

  1. Get a notebook to write notes. You can scribble anything you want to in this book, but you must keep it organized. Have a section for the story-line, a section for characters, a section for laying out the chapters, and so on. This helps you keep a focus on the overall story-line. Remember however, that some of this information may change, which is fine. You just need a direction.
  2. Type up your chapter layout. Once you have figured out how your story will flow, type it up. Again, this will likely change, but you have to start with something. Just remember to revise this whenever you switch things around.
  3. Start typing up the chapters. You may not be able to write all the chapters in order. If you can, that’s awesome, but oftentimes I skip to the chapters that I’ve already thought out.

That’s how you start!

If you’re struggling to get your novel on paper, all I can say to you is, stop worrying about it and start laying it out.

Remember too that every writer is different. Everyone has their own method. This is what works for me. If you don’t have a method, try this and adjust accordingly.

God bless you all in your endeavors!

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T.M. Gaouette – Author Profile Featured on Book Reviews and More and CatholicDadsOnline.org

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Why People-Watching Enhances Characterization in Fiction Writing

You’ll root for each child and for the Sunshine Ranch, while enjoying T.M. Gaouette’s rich prose and vivid descriptions.(writingstraight.com)

I love to people watch. I’ve done it for as long as I can remember. No matter where you are, you can people-watch -assuming there are people there, of course. And I believe it’s really helps me enhance character development in my fiction novel writing.

People-watching doesn’t involve staring at people to the point of discomfort, but rather watching them discretely and taking in the subtle details of natural behavior. It’s about witnessing how one interacts with another, within a group, and even alone. Every movement can be recorded for future use. Subtle details are as significant as the obvious, such as a narrowing of the eyebrow, a tilt of the head, and even a blank gaze. These are all valuable.

These gestures, expressions, and attitudes, when used appropriately, breathe life into a character.

People-watching is also an effective way of creating story-lines. Witnessing a couple sharing a meal in a restaurant, a family on a beach, or a person sitting alone can prompt many questions. Why are they here? What’re they talking about? How’s she feeling?

Then, we’re introduced to the other foster children, all with diverse issues: depression, sadness, loss, abuse, neglect. Their means of coping is uniquely crafted to each well-developed character. (writingstraight.com)

In my novel, The Destiny of Sunshine Ranch, I was pleased to note that many readers enjoyed my character development. And I believe that much of the credit goes to my habit of people-watching.

The characters are well developed and likable…I loved how Ms. Gaouette presented each child as unique, with his or her own defenses and coping mechanisms. (ourvillageisalittledifferent.com)

People-watching is a valuable tool, I feel. It introduces me to various types of characters, characteristics, and storylines. There’s truly nothing better than witnessing real life if your desire is to bring your characters to life in a novel.

Do you find that people-watching is a valuable tool for writing fiction ?

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Can Innocence, Purity, and God Prevail in a Highly Sexualized Era?

Sexy is in. Sex is prevalent. It’s in school, on the television, in the movie theaters, in books. Hot, half-naked boys and girls are everywhere, flaunting and flirting and getting it on.

Romance is attractive and sex is inevitable. At least, it seems that way to me. Look at teen fashion, and celebrities who wear practically nothing in an attempt to stay in the spotlight or grow within their industry.

Our innocent little girl celebs are resorting to sexualizing themselves so they don’t disappear behind the next young aspiring starlet that Disney picks up.

So how in the world can purity and innocence prevail in a highly sexual world where we’ve reached the point of no return?

Society has become so edgy and risqué, that nothings been left to the imagination. The physical body has been put on display for the world to ogle at. And morality is almost non-existent. Am I generalizing? Unjustly resorting to cynicism? Maybe…just a little. But one look at shows like Jersey Shore, Teen Mom, and Toddlers in Tiaras, and you can see what young teens are watching and assuming as real life.

And we are losing God along the way.

When it comes to fiction, teen girls want to read about finding passion in the arms of a young, handsome boy. That’s cool. Not basking and growing in the amazing love of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Who wants to read about teens who look beyond sex, when they can read about girls begging vampires for it, or college grads contracting themselves into bondage with sexual abusers? That’s more exciting, enticing, tempting.

Where’s the excitement in reading about Christian teens who don’t care about sex?  Teens who put sex where it belongs -in their future marriage- and deal with real issues that matter, like becoming better, kinder, stronger, hard working, honest people. Who wants to read about that? Who?

You?

Whether you do or not, I will continue to write about it, because God has placed that desire in my heart. It’s not the trend, it’s not sexy, but it gives me joy. For those of you who are interested, I pray you enjoy the stories I write to glorify Him.

Whether therefore you eat, or drink, or whatsoever you do, do all to the glory of God. (1 Corinthians 10:31)

Bless my words, Lord. So that I always glorify You in everything that I write.

My Cures for Defeating Writers Block

It’s a writer’s nightmare!

Writer’s block can be devastating for a fiction writer who doesn’t know how to fill the void.

But there are ways in which you can take advantage of writer’s block, at least until you’re ready to resume your manuscript.

  • Writer’s write, and even when the dreaded writer’s block sets in, you need to write. There doesn’t have to be a reason behind the words and you don’t have to stick to writing fiction. In fact, you can just write about how you’re feeling. Write about writer’s block. Why? This exercise will give you a reason to write. It also provides you with an outlet to communicate your emotions. Lastly, it’ll give you material for future projects.
  • Are you in the midst of a fiction novel and you just can’t move forward? Then jump to the good part. You know the part. It’s the scene that you play over and over in your head. It’s the reason why you’re writing the story. By jumping to the good part, you’re stimulating your outlook, and you’re making the story exciting again.
  • If you just can’t write, and no scene inspires you, then read. Reading is the next best thing to writing. Read back on your own work. Oftentimes, when you read your own work, you become inspired to write more. Or better still, you can use the opportunity to proofread and revise chapters.
  • In the event that reading your own work of fiction only depresses you, then read the work of your favorite author. This is often a great motivator because it reminds you of why you became a writer in the first place. It’s also a lesson in writing. When you read the work of your favorite authors, you’re often inspired by their writing and your desire to write like them -or in some cases, better than them- grows.
  • Do you have another fictional story in mind? Start writing it. The idea of having two manuscripts in the works may seem overwhelming, but it’s actually less stressful. It allows you to chop and change from one story to another when the mood strikes you. Your writer’s block is on one story, so just take a break from it. And rather than do nothing, work on the other story. Go back and forth as it suits you. Returning to a story after a period away often provides a fresh perspective.Read motivational stories from writers, such as Stephen King’s, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft. This memoir recalls King’s successes and failures, in addition to tips and advice on writing. Reading inspirational stories by successful writers motivates you to keep writing, because you’re reminded that even the most successful authors were lost for words.

Writer’s block doesn’t have to feel like a moment of failure. But you shouldn’t waste it on non-writing projects. Doing so will only cause guilt. Whatever method you choose to defeat your writer’s block, stay focused and disciplined. Think of writer’s block as an opportunity to take a break from your current project and work on another story or maybe catch up on some reading. Whatever you decide, take advantage of writer’s block, use it wisely, and it could be just what you need to make your story of fiction a success.

Best and blessings to you all.

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